Along the Luther Trail

As we enter the fall and approach the anniversary of Martin Luther’s nailing of the 95 Theses, I thought now would be the perfect time to share our trip along the Luther Trail, or “Lutherweg,” in Germany. We took this trip almost a year ago, just a couple of weeks before Reformation Day 2020. Over the course of two days, we ventured from Weimar, to Erfurt, to Eisenach, and finally to Wittenberg, sleeping each night in the back of our Volvo.

Day 1 – A monk’s life

We drove up most of the way to Weimar the night before and got an early start, hoping to see the famous Cranach altarpiece. The City Church of Saints Peter and Paul was not yet open when we arrived; so we snooped around the town, finding some bakery goodies to munch on, as well as the prison where Bach (yes, Johann Sebastian Bach himself!) was held for a few weeks. We also stumbled upon a beautiful park and bridge, where we watched ducks bob about and the reflection of fall-colored leaves dance on the river. These unexpected discoveries actually made Weimar a gem of our trip. After a quick dash back to the church to see the altarpiece, we hit the road for Erfurt.

Our first stop in Erfurt was the Augustinian monastery where Martin Luther became a monk. The monastery, once Catholic in the times of Luther, is still functioning, but now as a Protestant monastery. In the monastery’s chapel lies the gravestone of Johannes Zachariae– the zealous Catholic who condemned Luther’s predecessor Jan Hus to death–where Luther would lay and spend many prayerful hours. Our favorite part was seeing the Luther Cell, where he studied Scripture and worked meticulously as a young monk.

While we were in Erfurt, we walked over to the Merchant’s Bridge, which is the longest inhabited bridge in Europe. Erfurt was once famous for their production of woad, a blue plant-based dye. And one of the shops on this bridge continues to sell woad goods, honoring the centuries-old tradition.

Next, we drove over to the town of Eisenach to tour Wartburg Castle and experience some fine dining, Luther-style. Wartburg Castle was Luther’s hideout after he escaped capture at the Diet of Worms in 1521. Or I should say: his supporters “captured” him so that he would not be taken prisoner by the Pope. During his ten-month stay at Wartburg, Luther took on the pseudonym “Junker Jörg” (Knight George), translated the New Testament into German, and famously tossed his inkwell at the Devil. The castle itself was interesting to peruse, but we were honestly a bit underwhelmed.

As an aside, the castle we would most recommend for anyone interested in Luther history (or just an amazing castle in general) is the Veste Coburg. We visited this castle a couple of times on day-trips, prior to our Luther Trail adventure. And it spoiled us. The castle itself is authentic, boasting a luxurious hunting gallery, medieval ramparts and guard towers, a room walled with elaborate wood intarsia scenes, and a full collection of armor and weapons that left Tex with a dropped jaw. Additionally, the Luther section of the castle is much more visitor-friendly than Luther’s room at Wartburg. This was yet another place where he hid out from his Catholic pursuers for a few months.

Okay, back to the Luther Trail… After we finished at Wartburg, we headed down into the town of Eisenach to the Hotel Eisenacher Hof for a Lutherschmaus, or Luther meal. This turned out to be one of the most delicious and most memorable meals that we had during our time in Europe. And since we had saved money on sleeping arrangements by snoozing in the car, we felt justified in spending 30 Euro per meal. Ha!

As soon as we walked into the restaurant, we knew we were in for something special– the room was quite dim, lit only by massive candles, and the sound of medieval songs drifted through the air. Our multi-course meal began with a dark, crusty loaf of bread spread with schmalz (lard flavored with bits of pork crackling), mustard, and krauter yogurt. At the prompting of our waitress, we then drank our soups, one meat and one potato, from our bowls, since people in Luther’s day would not have used spoons. The main course included a true smorgasbord of German meats and sides, from a wonderful Thuringian sausage and meat skewer to spitzkohl (creamy cabbage), knödel (potato dumpling), and Katharina bread (some combination of Thanksgiving dressing and fruitcake, named after Luther’s industrious wife). Those are only three of the ten side dishes they served us; and every single one was certainly worth trying! The finale was a flaming fruit skewer, which brought our evening to an impressive close. Needless to say, we were not hungry for days after that.

Day 2- The work of the Reformation

We spent our second day in Wittenberg, which is famously known as the birthplace of the Reformation. It was in this town that Martin Luther lived with his family, taught, and worked for most of the rest of his life. First, we visited the Luther House Museum, which is a massive former monastery where Luther lived with his wife and children. Here we learned so much about Luther, both as a person and a Reformer. It was mind-boggling to see the amount of writing that this one man produced in his lifetime. I also enjoyed learning a bit about Katharina von Bora, the nun who married Martin Luther. Their household was always abuzz, between Luther’s Table Talks with students, Katharina’s many home-making endeavors (including beer-brewing, managing farmland and animals, bookkeeping…), and their dining table full of children, boarders, and reforming collaborators. I loved finding this quote from Luther in a letter about gardening: “No matter how much Satan is raging, meanwhile I will laugh at him and watch the gardens, that is the Creator’s blessings, and enjoy them to His praise… Just get me even more seeds for my garden, if ever possible many different varieties: If I am going to stay alive, I would want to become a gardener!”

Next, we stopped by the Cranach House and Workshop, where we enjoyed studying an old printing press like what the Reformers would have used to reproduce Luther’s and others’ writings. Lucas Cranach and his son were renowned painters who helped propagate the Reformation. The most famous portraits of Luther were Cranach masterpieces.

We then ambled over to St. Mary’s City Church, where Luther preached over 2,000 sermons. At St. Mary’s, we discovered a painting by Lucas Cranach the Younger called The Reformers in the Vineyard of the Lord… This work of art really struck me, with its stark contrast between those working for the Lord and those working selfishly against Him. Especially after seeing just how much the Reformers labored to bring about change in the Church, I was so encouraged by this idea: Working unto the Lord out of gratitude for the Life He gives, rather than working unto salvation which will always result in death.

Our final stop in Wittenberg was the famous Castle Church, where Luther nailed his Ninety-five Theses on October 31, 1517. After admiring the commemorative doors in the same place where Luther initiated the Protestant Reformation, we ventured into the church to find his grave, along with the grave of Philip Melanchthon. The church interior was simple, yet grand, and almost other-worldly as tranquil organ melodies echoed throughout.

Portugal: Doors, Tiles, and Ovos moles

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A couple of months ago, I had the treat of visiting my dear friend and her husband who were living near Porto, Portugal. Though my primary goal for the trip was seeing and hanging out with her, I was, of course, ecstatic to explore another European country. They were such wonderful hosts to me and took me all over the place to experience everything Portuguese.

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Exploring Porto…
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One of my favorite pastimes ended out being scouring the surrounding areas for unique tiles and colorful doors. There is an abundance! The city of Porto is decorated everywhere with the iconic blue and white tiles, from the train stations to the church exteriors. But even in the smaller towns nearby, there is no shortage of intricate tiles in every color imaginable.

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In Aveiro

My other favorite pastime was— wait for it— eating! Big surprise. Thankfully, my friend and I have always shared a love for food, so I was never hungry. After they picked me up from the airport, we went into Porto and ate a massive, Porto-original sandwich, called a Francesinha. I think there were about four or five different kinds of meat inside, and the amount of cheese on top was crazy! In general, I found that Portuguese food is quite rich and hearty. The baked goods in Portugal are hard to beat. From the delectable pastel de nata to the traditional, pillow-soft, sweet croissant, Portuguese treats kept our tummies full in the time between meals. Oh and did I mention the churros?!? Interestingly, these Portuguese churros far surpassed the Spanish version. Lastly, I was obliged to try the strange but popular egg yolk sweet, called ovos moles. The town of Aveiro is known as the home to these little novelties. I actually liked it, much to my friend’s chagrin, ha!

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Francesinha sandwich

We did so many other things too. And I wish I had more pictures to share. The view of Porto from the Gaia side of the river is stunning. The narrow, cobblestone alleyways are enchantingly medieval. The Ovar Thursday market is a bustling place of trade. The expansive, sandy beaches are warm and peaceful in February. And I mustn’t forget to mention the very awkward experience of accidentally walking in on a small, private funeral and backing out slowly.

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View over Porto and the Duoro River

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The vast Ovar beach

Under the Maltese Sun

The copious amount of sunshine was just one of the many pleasures of our recent trip to Malta. Needless to say, I sunburned a little. We spent three wonderful days on that tiny island and saw it all… well, almost.

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Day 1 – Off-roading and jaw-dropping vistas

The theme of Day 1 really did seem to be off-roading. We had rented a little manual Kia Picanto, and Tex adapted to driving on the left side rather seamlessly. But our GPS directed us to take some very rocky paths (I won’t even call them roads). Somehow, we made it out alive and laughing and with somewhat higher blood pressures. Anywho, our first stop was to see St. Paul’s Island on the north side of the island. This is where they claim that Paul and Luke shipwrecked. You can read about it in Acts 27. While this stop wasn’t initially part of our itinerary, it ended out being one of my favorite things. Not only is it incredible to think of the apostle clambering out of a wrecked ship right there, but it is also a beautiful display of God’s creation. And as a cherry on top, we were the only souls there to soak it in that morning.

 

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A view of St. Paul’s Island

From there, we drove down to Mdina, an ancient city near the center of the island. This was the capital of Malta during the time of Paul and is likely the town where Paul stayed for much of his time on the island. St. Paul’s Grotto (technically in the town of Rabat, but within walking distance of Mdina) is the underground site claimed to have been where Paul founded the first Christian community on Malta. We purchased tickets at the Wignacourt Museum, which gave us entrance to both the Grotto and St. Paul’s Catacombs, as well as some WWII bomb shelters. The catacombs are early (4th century AD) Christian burial grounds, made up of innumerable tunnels and cave-like rooms. We had never seen any catacombs before, and these were remarkably fun to explore. One of the special pieces of architecture down there was called an Agape table. It was at this table that certain funerary feasts took place in honor of the dead.

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One more memorable stop in Mdina was an adorable tea garden, called Fontanella Tea Garden. It sits on the edge of the city’s high wall and overlooks much of the island. We ordered tea and tried a couple of their popular cakes, a strawberry meringue and a lemon cheesecake. I was quite pleased with the quick service and decent prices of this little establishment.

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A splendid tea

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From our table in the tea garden…

A bit after noon, we hopped into the car and headed towards the Blue Grotto on the southwest coast of the island. We were amazed at how easy it was to cover pretty much the entire island of Malta in one day, well really only 2 hours, of driving. Once we arrived and parked, we headed out to buy tickets for the much-sought-after boat rides into the Blue Grotto. I can only imagine the crowds there in the summer, but early February proved to be the perfect time to visit. For only 8 Euros each, we rode in a small motorized fishing boat out into the crystal Mediterranean and cruised through several grottos, including the Cat’s Cave, Reflection Cave, and of course the Blue Grotto. The light turquoise water that you can see in one of the pictures is caused by white sand on the sea floor reflecting light back up through the water. This was truly breathtaking.

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Heading into the Blue Grotto

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Our last destination for the day was the southern tip of the island, near Marsaxlokk. We took in some sun and watched the waves lap against the stony edge of St. Peter’s Pool. While I do wish it had been warm enough for us to swim, we were happy to be there with fewer people. We also visited the Salinas salt pans, one area of many on the island which have been used since the Phoenicians first established them. Still today, throughout the summer months, there are families that tend to the salt pans and harvest the sea salt after the water has evaporated.

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St. Peter’s Pool

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The Salt Pans

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After a very long walk to a highly-reviewed and very much closed restaurant, we stopped at a little seaside joint in Marsaxlokk to eat. Tex had quite a plate of pan-fried calamari, and I had some yummy fish-filled ravioli.

Day 2 – The Maltese Capital

We spent all of Sunday in the capital city, Valletta, which boasts of forts, gardens, and long hilly streets. The two main things on our agenda were Fort St. Elmo and the Palace Armory. And of course, some renowned pizza.

To start off our morning, we began walking along the city wall towards the Upper Barrakka Gardens. I think we could have stayed in the gardens looking across the Grand Harbor all morning and never have gotten bored. Plus, it helps to have a walking encyclopedia like Tex to tell you all you need to know about the Great Siege which happened there.

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Looking across the Grand Harbor

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Upper Barrakka Gardens

We continued along the wall until we reached Fort St. Elmo (which was closed for another couple hours), and then walked into the old city center to the Palace Armory. The Armory seemed to be a fairly extensive collection, exhibiting everything from real Knights’ suits of armor to early guns. By this time, we were famished and rolled on down to Sally Port Pizzeria. I ordered the La Vallette pizza with Maltese sausage and goat cheese, and Tex had the Genovese pizza with pesto, parma ham, and “too much green stuff” (haha!). There weren’t any seats available at the restaurant. So we carried our pizzas down to a bench by the fort, tore the napkin in half, and devoured the pies while hungry spectators eyed us.

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Next, we finally made our way to the historical Fort St. Elmo. Some crazy things happened there. During the Great Siege, where the Ottomans were surrounding the Knights Hospitaller who inhabited the island, the Ottomans succeeded in taking Fort St. Elmo. The Ottomans subsequently slaughtered the defenders and floated their bodies across the Grand Harbor on wooden crosses. Some Knights who still remained in another fort, which I’ll discuss later, answered their foes with cannonballs made of the heads of Ottomans. Pretty gory and sad.

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View from the fort

To end the day, we roamed the streets of Valletta, poked our heads into a couple of churches, and grabbed some pastizzi to take back to the apartment. Traditional Maltese pastizzi are crunchy, flaky pastries filled with either ricotta or mushy peas. When still warm from the oven, these little things are delightful!

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Inside the magnificent St. John’s Co-Cathedral

Day 3 – A Place Called Victory

Well, actually, it has been called Birgu for its entire history and was renamed Vittoriosa about five centuries ago. Depending on who you are talking to, the town could be called either of those names. Personally, I like Vittoriosa, because it seems a fitting name for such a gloriously lovely town. Vittoriosa is built on one of the main peninsulas in the Grand Harbor and is known for its strong fortification, Fort St. Angelo. The town had a very medieval feel, with pale yellow stones paving the streets and covering the sides of houses. The Fort itself was more charming than an Italian villa. So charming that I told Tex he should become a Knight so that we could live there. (There is one resident Knight of the Order of St. John who has the privilege of doing so!)

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Defending Fort St. Angelo

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This is where I wanted to live in the Fort…

Fort St. Angelo was the fort I mentioned above where some knights remained after St. Elmo was taken in the Great Siege. It was here that the knights prevailed, hence the town’s name Vittoriosa.

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A quiet courtyard in the Fort

To wrap up our time there, we visited the Malta at War Museum, where we donned some hard hats to explore another underground network of bomb shelters. Malta was very heavily bombed by Axis planes during World War II, because of its critical location in the Mediterranean. The museum provided a unique look into the lifestyle of Maltese civilians during the War. Finally, we stopped in the town main square at the Café du Brazil, which served up our favorite meal of the trip… Maltese rabbit ravioli!

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That is the long and short of our most recent adventure. Thank you for taking the time to read it 🙂

Penny-Pinching in Strasbourg

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In October, we took a little camping trip over to the Black Forest and spent a day on the other side of the border in Strasbourg, France. I expected Strasbourg to be very German. And it is… But it certainly has a French feel too. Anywho, I thought I would share what we did and how we pinched a few pennies along the way.

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Crossing into Petite-France

Penny-pinching tip #1: Take your car. And take your tent. This has become one of our favorite ways to travel in Europe. We have camped in the Wachau Valley of Austria, the Netherlands, and now the Black Forest. Camping does not have to limit you to outdoor activities (though that is something we enjoy). A tent can also be your base from which to explore the bustling towns of Europe. Heck, you can still pack a nice sweater or a dress. I’ve done it. Europeans tend to pamper their campgrounds, which does annoy me sometimes, but I know a lot of people might prefer it. There are also Airbnb campsites, which is what we did this time. And we ended out spending for two nights probably half of what we would have spent on one night in a hotel. As an added bonus, you get to take in all the beauty of nature.

Additional advice: Park at park-and-rides in larger towns and cities. And then take advantage of the tram or bus system. This is usually cheaper than paying for parking in the city center… and less stressful, in my opinion.

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We happened upon this lovely church, after getting caught in the rain.

Penny-pinching tip #2: Go out for one big traditional meal, instead of three meals a day. This is a tip we also implemented in Ireland. I would especially recommend making lunch your big meal, because menus tend to be cheaper. So real question– how do you get by on one restaurant meal per day? My answer– bring snacks from home to tide you over and/or go to the grocery store and cook for yourself. On our Black Forest trip, I made these pumpkin energy balls, packed some homemade biscuits, and brought along a couple other snacks. So breakfast was covered, and the snacks pretty much got us through lunch (I must admit that they were supplemented by a few “pain au chocolats” that we picked up from a bakery as soon as we got into Strasbourg).

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Mouth-watering French pastries

The meal that we ordered that night in Strasbourg still makes me laugh. One of the must-have regional dishes is called “choucroute,” French for sauerkraut. It’s ironic because we live in Germany, the land of limitless sauerkraut, and yet on our little excursion into France, what did we order? Why, choucroute! I have never seen such a massive pile of sauerkraut. They served it warm with a few different pork cuts and potatoes. It was quite hearty and delicious.

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You might not be able to tell… but there is a huge pile of sauerkraut underneath the meat!

Alternative to PP tip #2: Street Food! This is another of my and Tex’s favorite ways to eat plenty without breaking the bank.

Penny-pinching tip #3: Be a low-maintenance traveler. This is one that I am still working on… Ahem, yes, I did ask Tex to buy us some [DELICIOUS] lemon shortbread cookies at a specialty cookie shop. But honestly, it is not very difficult to spend an entire day just wandering the streets of a lovely European town, without spending money. Soak in the architecture, even of commonplace houses. Feast your eyes upon bakery displays. Walk on into that beautiful cathedral or through that peaceful park. Be a person who can appreciate things without having the thing. I’m preaching to myself here.

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Strasbourg’s charm did not disappoint. We promptly found the cathedral, which was stunning. It actually may tie (with St. Peter’s Dom in Regensburg) for my favorite cathedral. I am so glad that we decided to wait in the long line to go inside. Entry was free! We meandered through the streets surrounding the cathedral. All kinds of signs and banners decorated one of the streets, and countless bakery windows were filled with every manner of sweet treats and breads.

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Inside the lovely cathedral

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These beautiful stained-glass windows!

Next, we decided to visit the most famous and historic part of town, Petite-France. Half-timbered houses, adorned with flower boxes in the windows, lined the edges of the canals. We strolled over cobble-stoned footbridges and gaped at the quaint beauty surrounding us.

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Half-timbered buildings and canals in Petite-France

Those are all the penny-pinching tips that I can think up right now. Hopefully, I’ll have more soon ♥